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This article is taken from the April 2000 Phatlalatsa newsletter

 

From the sideline

Hansie and the boys have just won an historic test series in India, then lost the one-day series against the same opponents, then went on to lose the triangular series in Sharjah. Now the team is embroiled in allegations of match-fixing!

While Makhaya Ntini was an important part of the side in Sharjah, the team’s composition left one wondering how the development and transformation of the game was proceeding at the lower levels.

Over a year ago, the United Cricket Board launched its Transformation Charter - a broad-based plan to address the inequities of the past – and appointed a monitoring committee to oversee the entire process. While this was commendable, very little has been heard of the work of this committee or how the sporting code of cricket is coming to grips with transformation and development.

In September last year, Minister Balfour alluded to the introduction of performance contracts for each and every sporting code. These contracts were then to form the cornerstone of the process of transformation in sport. Again, very little has been heard of this since.

Since the 1995 Rugby World Cup, there have been repeated efforts and veiled threats to hold the sport administrators accountable for transformation of their respective codes. To give these efforts and threats any substance, one needs to have detailed information about the state of play in each of the codes. At what stage is development? What resources are needed and where? How are different individuals feeling and thinking about the development?

Regular monitoring and evaluation would provide this information. It is only then, with detailed and nuanced information at one’s fingertips, that one can more objectively view the transformation process in its entirety rather than solely reacting to the composition of our national cricket team.

Mzungu Lekgoa’s blueprint for this monitoring and evaluation includes:

    • A baseline measure to establish the current state of affairs.
    • A needs assessment to see what resources are needed where as well as to establish the Key Performance Indicators which are to be periodically tracked and against which the transformation can be assessed.
    • A monitoring and evaluation system that regularly assesses the state of the transformation programme and reflects on the progress, blockages and challenges that transformation throws up.

We are in the midst of exciting and challenging Times New Roman regarding the transformation and development of our society and sport is no exception. It is imperative, however, that this transformation and development is documented not only for the present but also the future. And for a small fee, Mzungu can design a system for you…

 

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