home
the team
newsletters
about
cape town
stnews
downloads
links
 
   

This article is taken from the March 2002 Phatlalatsa newsletter

 

The Kellogg Pilot

The Kellogg Pilot imageReaders of Phatlalatsa will know that S&T has been providing monitoring and evaluation services to the WK Kellogg Foundation Africa Programme for two years. This has included designing a multi-country baseline survey; S&T partner Nobayethi Dube describes the pilot phase, which she managed.

PILOTING THE INSTRUMENT

As part of the continuing support that Strategy & Tactics (S&T) has been giving to the Kellogg Foundation, S&T helped design a baseline survey questionnaire and managed a pilot of 100 households in the Mount Frere area.

Mount Frere is a rural area, 98 km from Umtata. The pilot was undertaken with the help of Isinamva Community Development Centre, a Non-Governmental Organisation (NGO) which is funded by Kellogg Foundation. This organisation facilitated access to the communities we visited, namely Mbodleni and Mhlokwana. They also recruited the twelve young people who were used as fieldworkers during the pilot.

The Kellogg Foundation invited four of their District Facilitators from Lesotho, Limpopo and Zimbabwe to observe the training and assist in the field, because the baseline survey itself will be implemented in all the countries where Kellogg is implementing its integrated rural development programme.

TRAINING

Training for the pilot took place over two days. The training was based on how to administer the questionnaire as well as on sampling methods. The first day was spent going through the questionnaire in detail and addressing each question carefully. We then staged role-playing exercises with interviewers using scenarios that may come up in the field. The purpose of role-play was also to come up with translations for some of the concepts used in the questionnaire.
The second day was spent training fieldworkers in sampling methods - this was important since this was a dual-level survey which included household information from the head of the household, and attitudinal and other information from a randomly sampled household member.

To select the household, we used a public place (schools, shops) as a starting point, moving towards the concentration of houses. Because the villages that we visited had very scattered homesteads, we administered the questionnaire at every third homestead/stand.

The second stage of sampling involved identifying the head of the selected household. For the pilot, the head of household was identified by asking simply who headed the household, and in their absence (where it was long-term) we followed up by asking who made important financial decisions for the household and could respond to questions about the household. This became the respondent for Section A of the questionnaire that covered household-level information.

The third stage of sampling involved identifying the second respondent - who answered questions in Section B of the questionnaire relating to attitudes, values, gender & youth, and related matters - for which we used the birthday rule. This simple randomisation rule selects the person whose birthday is next in the household as respondent. It should be noted that in some instances the head of household could also respond to questions in Section B, by virtue of being the one who celebrates their birthday next.

The second day also involved going out to the nearest village to administer the questionnaire - to pilot the pilot, as it were. The purpose for this exercise was to see how long the questionnaire took to administer, if respondents understood the questions, and if there were any other problems. This also allowed us to have a feedback session where we further developed translations.

FIELDWORK

The actual fieldwork began on the third day. The fieldwork team was welcomed by the community but there were the usual problems where potential respondents felt that 'filling these papers is a waste of time'. In some instances we could not get access to respondents because they were working in town, or conducting their daily chores such as fetching water from the river. This meant that we had to arrange for second or third visits. The exercise also highlighted that rural communities have busy lives and are not just readily available. The pilot took four days to be completed.

S&T will analyse the data in order to assess the extent to which the survey measures Kellogg's indicators. Nobayethi will draft a fieldwork report, fleshing out the issues raised above. Thereafter, Kellogg and its partners will decide how to move ahead with the baseline survey.

 

[top] [to ] [Previous page]
     
home
the team
newsletters
about
contact
stnews
downloads
links