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This article is taken from the May 2004 Phatlalatsa newsletter

 

S&T drafts framework report for Phase II of Kenya 's National Civic Education Programme

Readers of Phatlalatsa will know that S&T has been heavily involved in the Kenyan national civic education programme (NCEP). We helped devise the management structure and overall orientation of the programme in 1999, and undertook a large baseline survey (against which NCEP could measure progress) in 2001. In 2003, DANIDA (acting on behalf of the Like-Minded Donor Group) appointed S&T to draft the framework report for the second phase of the programme (NCEP II).

NCEP I

Phase I of NCEP reached a massive 17% of the population in some two years. CSOs of all types small, local community-based organisations, professional NGOs from Nairobi , faith-based groups, theatre companies and others spread right across the country to educate and inform citizens about their rights, the central tenets of democracy, the importance of nationhood and other civic education messages. Despite coming under heavy fire from then President Arap Moi and some of his ministers, NCEP facilitators stuck to their approach of neutrality and non-partisanship.

Camel trains took the messages into the desert regions, while boat trains worked their way up the coast, reaching marginalised and impoverished fishing communities. Community theatre followed by robust debate took the messages of democracy, freedom and rights into the most far-flung parts of this massive, beautiful country.

Phatlalatsa published a report on NCEP I written by two of the programme's key managers, Karuti Kanyinga and Carl Wesselink, written after the programme ended prior to the Kenyan presidential election. They concluded by arguing that the real test of NCEP's efficacy would be the result of the election and if they were right, the programme was extremely successful, with Arap Moi being ousted in favour of a rainbow alliance. Interviews with current government ministers in Kenya have shown how warmly they regarded NCEP I, and the positive role it played in engendering a deeper appreciation of democracy in Kenya .

NCEP II

Evaluations of NCEP I strongly recommended that a second phase of the programme be implemented. S&T was invited to tender for the job of consulting all the relevant stakeholders and drafting a report that sets out clearly the nature, purpose and goals of NCEP II, including logframe development and costing.

S&T's David Everatt and Ross Jennings spent a week in Nairobi in December 2003, interviewing a range of players and gathering information. At the same time, a consultant was working on issues relating to mainstreaming HIV/AIDS, regarded as crucial for NCEP II. A draft report combining all the above was circulated in early 2004. David was in Nairobi again in early March, where he facilitated a two-day workshop that brought together donors, the five large consortia of civil society organisations, as well as individual CSOs. Despite expectations of some tough negotiation, the workshop went extremely smoothly, and agreement was reached on all key issues.

The final report will be submitted by the end of March, and NCEP II will hopefully be up and running a couple of months thereafter.

 

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