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This article is taken from the August 2001 Phatlalatsa newsletter

 

S&T and insideout assess the impact of JUPMET training on the Public Sector

S&T, in conjunction with insideout (a dynamic, all-women evaluation team), are completing a strategic assessment of the impact of the programmes offered by the six universities that make up the Joint Universities Public Management Education Trust (JUPMET) consortium. The specific aim of JUPMET is to empower management in the public sector.

The challenge faced by S&T and insideout has been to examine both the training received by public sector officials in either 1998 or 1999 and the impact this training has had on the public sector organisations where these people were employed. Thus the question we have been attempting to answer is whether the changes in both the invidualís behaviour and the organisationís well-being can be attributed to JUPMET.

Data collection

In order to answer this question the study has been undertaken in two-parts. In the first part telephonic interviews were conducted with a total of 392 trainees who participated in short courses or degree programmes in either 1998 or 1999.  Trainee participants were selected from all six of the universities.  Perceptions regarding the impact on the organisation were enhanced through the inclusion of 103 supervisors. In the second part, 84 in-depth interviews were conducted with trainees, supervisors, stakeholders and beneficiaries to assess in greater detail their perceptions of the efficiency and effectiveness of JUPMET.One of the most difficult aspects of the data collection has been the tracing of individuals who went on the courses. Readers will be familiar with the fact that there is a high turnover of staff in the public sector, we all probably know someone who has been promoted, moved to another section, moved to another department or even left the public sector altogether. What took us by surprise was how many people who had been on the JUPMET courses had moved on since 1998/1999. Of the roughly 2 500 names provided to us by the client, approximately a third (31%) were no longer at the work address the trainee had provided when she/he took the course.

Analysis

To assist us with our analysis, a review of literature and previous studies of training in the public sector was undertaken.  Five indicators were identified on which all of the research instruments were based - training effectiveness (e.g. relevance of training); self-efficacy (e.g. personal goal setting); organisational culture (e.g. organisational rewards and incentives); personal effectiveness (e.g. behaviour shifts) and organisational effectiveness (e.g. ability to implement what was learnt). Thus the analysis will explore how training, bearing in mind both the individualís self-efficacy and the culture of the organisation within which they work, contributes to both the effectiveness of the individual and the organisation.

 

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